Other Moons of Earth earth39s other 39moon39 and its crazy orbit could reveal Earth Moons of Other

Other Moons of Earth earth39s other 39moon39 and its crazy orbit could reveal Earth Moons of Other

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In September 2015, a new study provided an important missing piece to the intriguing puzzle of how our Moon came to be the lovely object that we see today.



The Moon in us is always that inner child who likes to play and have fun and each of us look for this in our own way. Even when we grow older we still look for things we enjoy or that bring us emotional nourishment.



Brilliant, icy short-period comets invade the bright and toasty inner Solar System, far from their frozen domain in the Kuiper Belt. The Kuiper Belt is the reservoir of comet nuclei that is located closest to Earth. Short-period comets rampage into the inner Solar System more frequently than every 200 years. The more distant long-period comets streak into the inner Solar System's melting warmth and comforting light every 200 years--at least--from the Oort Cloud. Because Earth dwells closer to the Kuiper Belt than to the Oort Cloud, short-period comets are much more frequent invaders, and have played a more important part in Earth's history than their long-period kin. Nevertheless, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are sufficiently small, distant, and dim to have escaped the reach of our scientific technology until 1992.